Argumentative essay

By | September 3, 2018

Just like writing any other literary work, writing an argumentative essay involves following the basic rules of essay writing. These include having an introduction, body and then the conclusion. The difference between an argumentative essay and any other essay comes in the details of the general outline. In the introduction, there needs to be a hook. A hook is simply that kind of sentence that raises the interest of the reader, or captures a reader’s attention to the work. It usually comes as the first sentence in most cases. An argumentative essay structure entails; identification of a topic, choosing a stand on it, collection of evidence on the stand taken, giving a concise argument about it, and then giving counterarguments about the same. An argumentative essay definition aims to provide all the sides or perspectives of a given topic, then trying to convince the reader or the audience to agree with the writer’s stand. As a result, a good introduction, description and persuasive approach are quite important in writing a good one. If you do not have time to write an essay, the EduJungles service is for you

The introduction also consists of some prior information about the topic in question, as well as the thesis statement. It is important to refer to a sample argumentative essay in case one has uncertainties. Prior information is where one gives some brief background of the issue to be discussed. The importance of this background information is that it helps the reader to conceptualize the issue at hand. It also provides the basic context upon which the writer can make the arguments in the paper. Once this is done, the next step is presenting the thesis statement. The thesis is a brief description of what exactly, the paper is talking about. A good thesis statement should take on a particular stance concerning the topic, in such a manner that the reader can be in a position to take a differing stand if necessary. It is therefore important to note that the thesis statement indicates the stand taken by the writer, rather than a fact.

When it comes to the body of the essay, a number of things should be considered. It all begins with having clear arguments to support the stand taken in the thesis. Each argument is then supported by staking a claim. Once a claim is made, what follows is the evidence to validate it. Evidence can be defined as a set of facts or factual information that can be easily justified by using credible references or sources. Each claim should, therefore, have evidence to back it up accordingly. The final and arguably most important bit of a good argumentative essay is the counterargument section. Here, the writer offers the opinions or arguments that might be given by an opposing view and then rebuts them. The importance of this part is not just to acknowledge differing opinions that might be aired, but to contend with those views suing concrete evidence against them.

When it comes to the conclusion, one needs to keep in mind two things; winding up the paper, and giving a caveat.  Winding up the paper entails going through what has been discussed al through the paper, and restating the initial stand as given in the thesis statement. Then the caveat is given. Giving a caveat simply means, trying to illustrate what would be the case if the views or arguments given in the paper are not followed. Finishing up the paper with a caveat helps to leave the reader with an inner conviction that indeed the arguments given throughout the paper are valid and worth keeping tabs on.